Martin (Patrimony) Thornton on Lectio Divina

(H/t to Matthew Dallman.) Bible reading, meditation, can only be attempted from within the fellowship of the living Church, which includes its theological tradition, its liturgical worship and its pastoral guidance. Thus, all prayer begins with Baptismal incorporation into the Sacred Humanity of the Risen and Glorified Lord. The Bible can feed, inspire, and articulate…

Exquisite Blandness and Acedia

Congratulations to the inaugural group of oblate-candidates on reaching the mid-point of the year of candidacy! As happens in the monastic novitiate, so too, I suspect, does it occur for oblate-candidates: the novelty of ordering one’s life according to the Rule wears off, and one confronts the sameness of daily praying the Office, reciting the…

Birthday of the Oxford Movement

(H/t to Fr. Steve Petrica for posting this on Facebook. I had forgotten the sermon fell on 14 July—a different kind of revolution than the more famous quatorze juillet revolution.  Richard Church’s History of the Oxford Movement is a moving account of this important moment in Anglican history and ends in 1845, the year of…

Lectio Divina Selon André Louf

(H/t to Matthew Dallman for posting this splendid quote.) “One of the ways [to turn to God] used by all monks is Lectio Divina. Monks prefer this old Latin term to anything modern, as the modern term ‘spiritual reading’ does not denote the same thing at all. Lectio for the monk means reading the word…

Feast of St. Benedict, Patriarch of Western Monasticism

Wishing everyone a blessed feast of St. Benedict. H/t to Clint Brand for the following quote from Bl. John Henry Newman: “St. Benedict found the world, physical and social, in ruins, and his mission was to restore it in the way not of science, but of nature, not as if setting about to do it,…