St. Elphege of Canterbury

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Copied from Sanctoral.com: Saint Elphege (also spelled Ælfheah) was born in the year 954, of a noble Saxon family. He became a monk in the monastery of Deerhurst, near Tewkesbury, England, and afterwards lived as a hermit near Bath, where he founded a community under…

St. Robert de Turlande

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Copied from Wikipedia: Robert de Turlande (c. 1000 – 17 April 1067) was of French noble stock and was related to Saint Gerald d’Aurillac.  He is best known for the establishment of the Benedictine convent of La Chaise-Dieu (‘Home of God’) and for his total…

St. Fructuosus of Braga

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints Copied from the Catholic Encyclopedia: An Archbishop, d. 16 April, c. 665. He was the son of a Gothic general and studied in Palencia. After the death of his parents, he retired as a hermit to a desert in Galicia. Numerous pupils gathered around him,…

Venerable Rupert of Deutz

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Copied from the works of Abigail Ann Young, February 1998: Rupert was born around 1075 and died in 1129. There are few fixed dates in his life.  Though the general picture is clear, many details remain conjectural. He was a Benedictine monk who was educated…

Blessed Ida of Louvain

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Copied from Wikipedia: Ida of Louvain (died around 1300) was a Cistercian nun of Roosendael Abbey in the 13th-century Low Countries who is officially commemorated in the Catholic Church as blessed. Ida was born into a well-to-do family in Leuven, Duchy of Brabant (now Belgium)….

St. Alferius de la Cava

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Copied from America Needs Fatima: Alferius was born in 930 into the Pappacarboni family which descended from the ancient princes of Lombardy. In the year 1002, at the age of seventy-two, Alferius was sent to France by Guaimaro the Duke of Salerno as an ambassador…

Jeremy Taylor and Service of God

Hood-doff to Fr. Matthew Cuthbert Dallman, Obl.S.B., for the Jeremy Taylor quote below.  Throughout Taylor’s Holy Living, references to “service” are generally references to what we would no call liturgy or worship.  Here, then, is another reminder of one of the important characteristics of the Anglican patrimony: liturgy is at the center of Anglican spirituality. …

Assembling an Anglican-Patrimonial Bibliography: The English Reformation

After a few requests for reading lists concerning the Anglican patrimony, I’m attempting to put together a bibliography—or two bibliographies, since I would like to have one that is more detailed for the sake of extensive scholarship and one that aims at listing only what would be considered essential authors and texts. Please feel free…

St. Hugh of Rouen

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. St. Hugh of Rouen Copied from Catholic.org: Benedictine bishop of Rouen, Paris, and Bayeux, France, a nephew of Charles Martel. The son of Duke Drogo of Burgundy, he was named the bishop of Rouen in 722. He then moved to Paris and later to Bayeux….

St. Walter de Pontoise

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Copied from FaithND & Wikipedia: Though St. Walter of Pontoise did not want to be in the public eye and longed for a life of solitude, he could not escape the leadership roles to which he was called. He lived in 11th century France and…

St. Eberhard

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Translated from German and Italian sources: Born to the nobility. Count of Nellenberg, Swabia (in modern Germany). Married to Blessed Ita of Nellenberg. Founded the Benedictine monastery of Allerheiligen (All Saints) in Schaffhausen, Swabia, whose altar was consecrated by Leo IX on 22 November 1049…

Saint Æthelburh

From Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.’s continuing series on monastic saints. Copied from Nobility.org: Saint Æthelburh, also known as Ethelburga, Ædilburh and Æthelburga (Old English: Æþelburh), was an early Anglo-Saxon queen consort of Northumbria, the second wife of King Edwin. As she was a Christian from Kent, their marriage triggered the initial phase of the conversion…