St. Tatwin

on

Continuing the series on monastic saints, compiled by Jason John Edwards, Obl.S.B.

[The photo is of the nave of the parish church at Breedon-on-the-Hill. Breedon was formerly Briudun, where St. Tatwin was a monk.]

From Catholic Encyclopedia.

Archbishop of Canterbury; died 30 July 734. A Mercian by birth, he became a monk at Briudun in Worcestershire. The Venerable Bede describes him as “a man illustrious for religion and prudence and excellently instructed in the sacred letters” (Hist. Eccl., V, xxiii).

He was elected to succeed Brihtwald as Archbishop of Canterbury, and was consecrated there on 10 June 731, afterwards receiving the pallium from the pope. (Symeon Dunelm., “Hist. Reg.”, II, 30). During his brief episcopate of three years he blessed Nothbald, the new Abbot of St. Augustine’s Abbey, who had succeeded Tatwin’s friend, Albinus, and he also consecrated bishops for Lindsey and Selsey.

After his death miracles were wrought through his intercession, an account of which was written by Goscelin. Certain rhymed œnigmata or riddles (published by Giles in “Anecdota Bedæ”, 1851) are ascribed to him, and he is said to have written some poems in Anglo-Saxon which have been lost.

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